. He married Oghul Qaimish of the Merkit clan. As the eldest son of Ögedei Khan and a grandson of Genghis Khan, he reigned from 1246 to 1248. Name Edit.

Güyük, also spelled Kuyuk, (born 1206, Mongolia—died 1248, Mongolia), grandson of Genghis Khan and eldest son and successor of Ögödei, the first khagan, or great khan, of the Mongols.. Güyük was elected to the throne in 1246, partly through the maneuvering of his mother. Oghul Qaimish (died 1251) was the principal wife of Güyük Khan and ruled as regent over the Mongol Empire after the death of her husband in 1248. As the eldest son of Ögedei Khan and a grandson of Genghis Khan, he reigned from 1246 to 1248. In 1233, Guyuk, along with his maternal cousin Alchidai and the Mongol general Tangghud, conquered the short-lived Dongxia Kingdom of Puxian Wannu, who was a rebellious Jin official, [1] in a few months. . On 1246 John of Plano Carpini the Franciscan friar and envoy of Pope Innocent IV was sent to Karakorum, the Mongol Capital with a letter from Pope Innocent IV to invite mongols to Christianty. Güyük received military training and served as an officer under Genghis Khan and Ögedei Khan.He married Oghul Qaimish of the Merkit clan. Batu was a son of Jochi and grandson of Genghis Khan. Batu Khan : biography 1207 – 1255 Batu Khan ( , ; c. 1207–1255) was a Mongol ruler and founder of the Ulus of Jochi (or Golden Horde), the sub-khanate of the Mongol Empire.
The Borjigin family was the royal family of the Mongol Empire, dating back to the 13th and 14th centuries. Güyük Khan Güyük (c. March 19 1206–April 20 1248) was the third Great Khan of the Mongol Empire. Güyük received military training and served as an officer under Genghis Khan and Ögedei Khan. In the 1240s, one of Genghis's descendants, Güyük Khan, wrote a letter to Pope Innocent IV which used the preamble "Dalai (great/oceanic) Khagan of the great Mongolian state (ulus)". Batu Khan was approximately five feet and seven inches tall, and had at least four children: Sartak Khan, khan of the Golden Horde from 1255–1256 Toqo Khan (c1227-c1255) Andewan (c1230-c1245) Ulagchi – probably the son of Sartaq often named Ju Lai (Dzhulaibek) Batu Khan : biography 1207 – 1255 Batu Khan ( , ; c. 1207–1255) was a Mongol ruler and founder of the Ulus of Jochi (or Golden Horde), the sub-khanate of the Mongol Empire. He was the grandson of Genghis Khan, the conqueror who founded the Mongol Empire. Güyük received military training and served as an officer under Genghis Khan and Ögedei Khan.He married Oghul Qaimish of the Merkit clan. Güyük Khan, a grandson of Genghis Khan by his son Ögedei, who was the third Great Khan, inheriting the title from his father Ögedei who had inherited it from Genghis. This family tree only lists prominent members of the Borjigin family and does not reach the present. Early life. Genghis Khan appears in the middle of the tree, and Kublai Khan appears at the bottom of the tree. Güyük Khan was the third of the “Great Khans” who ruled the Mongol Empire. Early life. After his death, it was his widow Töregene who ruled as the regent until 1246. ... Güyük Khan. Güyük received military training and served as an officer under his grandfather Genghis Khan and later his father Ögedei Khan (after the death of Genghis in 1227). Güyük (c. 1206–1248) was the third Great Khan of the Mongol Empire. 1233 In 1233, Güyük, along with his maternal cousin Alchidai and the Mongol general Tangghud, conquered the short-lived Dongxia Kingdom of Puxian Wannu, who was a rebellious Jin official, in a few months. In 1233, Güyük, along with his maternal cousin Alchidai and the Mongol general Tangghud, conquered the short-lived Dongxia Kingdom of Puxian Wannu, who was a rebellious Jin official, in a few months.
Genghis Khan was a legendary political leader, who is famous even today for having established the powerful Mongol dynasty. Güyük Khan Güyük (c. March 19 1206–April 20 1248) was the third Great Khan of the Mongol Empire. Güyük Khan was the third Great Khan of the Mongol Empire. His ulus was the chief state of the Golden Horde […] In the 1240s, one of Genghis's descendants, Güyük Khan, wrote a letter to Pope Innocent IV which used the preamble "Dalai (great/oceanic) Khagan of the great Mongolian state (ulus)". He was the eldest son of Ögödei (Ukadāy) by his chief wife Töregene (Turākina/ā Ḵātun), and was born in 1206 (Abramowski, p. 151). Güyük Khan, 978-620-0-90114-9, Please note that the content of this book primarily consists of articles available from Wikipedia or other free sources online. What is referred to in English as the Mongol Empire was called the Ikh Mongol Uls (ikh: "great", uls: "state"; Great Mongolian State). He was the eldest son of Ögedei Khan, grandson of Genghis Khan, and reigned from 1246 to 1248. Batu was a son of Jochi and grandson of Genghis Khan. She later handed over the throne to her eldest son Güyük. Güyük received military training and served as an officer under his grandfather Genghis Khan and later his father Ögedei Khan (after the death of Genghis in 1227). Ogedei had seven sons - Güyük, the 3rd Great Khan of the Mongols, Koden, Khochu, Qarachar, Qashi, Melig, and Kadan. Genghis Khan Biography. The family tree of Genghis Khan is listed below. Güyük Khan was the third of the “Great Khans” who ruled the Mongol Empire. As the eldest son of Ögedei Khan and a grandson of Genghis Khan… He was the grandson of Genghis Khan, the conqueror who founded the Mongol Empire.