AI is based on the ingestion and processing of data, and the data for emerging economies is not yet on the radar of the creators of today’s AI. It is less developed than countries classified as “developed countries” but these nations are ranked higher than “less economically developed countries.”

Leading AI countries could capture an additional 20 to 25 percent in net economic benefits, compared with today, while developing countries might capture only about 5 to 15 percent. However, this definition is not universally agreed upon. A developing country (or a low and middle income country (LMIC), less developed country, less economically developed country (LEDC), medium-industrialized country or underdeveloped country) is a country with a less developed industrial base and a low Human Development Index (HDI) relative to other countries. It should be a priority of companies, countries and international bodies to increase their focus on developing AI systems that The kinds of jobs common in developing countries—such as routine agricultural work—are substantially more susceptible to automation than the service jobs—which require creative work or face-to-face interaction—that dominate high-income economies.

Also, people are very much habituated to the existing older technologies and find it difficult to adapt to the AI-based systems. Thus they may not sufficiently reflect the contexts and priorities of developing countries. So, rather than needing for every country to compete with the US and China on AI in general, I would advice most countries to use AI to strengthen what that country is good at and what that country wants to do in the future. Another application of AI in developing countries is smart agriculture.

In this article, we are going to address what role can current AI in developing countries’ banking sector. Based on our research, the most popular applications of AI in agriculture appear to fall into three major categories: Agricultural Robots – Companies are developing and programming autonomous robots to handle essential agricultural tasks such as harvesting crops … Artificial Intelligence (AI) is here to stay and it is all around us.

Developing countries lack scope, tools, knowledge, skilled professionals, and thus the growth of AI in developing countries is slow. DEVELOPING COUNTRIES AI could transform healthcare in developing economies. The kinds of jobs common in developing countries—such as routine agricultural work—are substantially more susceptible to automation than the service jobs—which require creative work or face-to-face interaction—that dominate high-income economies. Farmers monitor crops more effectively and make better predictions on planting, weeding and harvesting using AI tools. It creates disruptive changes that open more opportunities for growth while providing the means to train the human resources needed in growing and changing industries.

Automation is likely to affect developing countries in different ways to high-income countries. Thus, it stimulates development from within.


Automation is likely to affect developing countries in different ways to high-income countries. “In India, there are 4,200 start-ups, the third-largest start-up ecosystem in the world. AI and developing economies. The current ravishing trends of Artificial Intelligence is hailing all the industries across different countries. According to our research at Oxford, about 40% of jobs in Europe are vulnerable to AI over the coming decades, almost half of jobs in the USA, and an even greater share in developing countries. AI has the power to remould and better develop countries from within, by allowing tech talent to thrive. AI has the power to recognise faces, run autonomous cars, deliver better online outcomes and strengthen business in various industries. Emerging markets are traditionally short of doctors and will remain so for the time being.

This is my expression of grief over my countries’ banking systems current situation.

A developing country is also known as an LMIC, or a low and middle income country.
Many developed countries might have no choice but to push AI to capture higher productivity growth as their GDP-growth momentum slows—in many cases, partly reflecting the challenge due to aging populations.

the impact of AI in developing markets is left to the private sector. AI can help tech talents and the tech industry thrive in developing countries. AI could assist doctors to make better decisions, but also assist less qualified but trained medical personnel to take